How it Works

It’s real simple!

  • Find the seeds you want
  • Take the seeds you want
  • Bring back seeds to share (give to the desk for the Adult Librarian)

Where is the Seed Library

The seed library is located next to the New Books. Just ask staff at the desk!

Available Seeds

We have 3 types of seeds: Fruits/Vegetables, Flowers/Herbs, and Rare Seeds! Please keep in mind while we carry these seeds, we may be out of stock at the moment. The list below is to help you see what we normally carry and their information. Thank you!

Fruits & Vegetables:

The bell pepper (also known as sweet pepper, pepper, or capsicum is the fruit of plants in the Grossum cultivar group of the species Capsicum annuum. Preferred growing conditions for bell peppers include warm, moist soil in a temperature range of 21 to 29 °C (70 to 84 °F).

The carrot (Daucus carota subsp. sativus) is a root vegetable, typically orange in color, though purple, black, red, white, and yellow cultivars exist. Fast-growing cultivars mature within three months (90 days) of sowing the seed, while slower-maturing cultivars need a month longer (120 days).

Celery (Apium graveolens) is a marshland plant in the family Apiaceae that has been cultivated as a vegetable since antiquity. Celery leaves are pinnate to bipinnate with rhombic leaflets 3–6 centimetres (1–2+1⁄2 inches) long and 2–4 cm (1–1+1⁄2 in) broad. The flowers are creamy-white, 2–3 mm (3⁄32–1⁄8 in) in diameter, and are produced in dense compound umbels.

is a cereal grain first domesticated by indigenous peoples in southern Mexico about 10,000 years ago.[1][2] The leafy stalk of the plant produces pollen inflorescences and separate ovuliferous inflorescences called ears that yield kernels or seeds. Often grows 10 feet in height.

Cucumber (Cucumis sativus) is a widely-cultivated creeping vine plant in the Cucurbitaceae gourd family that bears usually cylindrical fruits, which are used as vegetables. The cucumber is a creeping vine that roots in the ground and grows up trellises or other supporting frames, wrapping around supports with thin, spiraling tendrils.

Green beans are the unripe, young fruit of various cultivars of the common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris). Bush beans are short plants, growing to not more than 2 feet (61 cm) in height, often without requiring supports.

Scallions (also known as green onions or spring onions or sibies) are vegetables derived from various species in the genus Allium. Scallions have a milder taste than most onions. Although the bulbs of many Allium species are used as food, the defining characteristic of spring onion species is that they lack a fully developed bulb.

Lettuce (Lactuca sativa) is an annual plant of the daisy family, Asteraceae. It is most often grown as a leaf vegetable, but sometimes for its stem and seeds. Plants generally have a height and spread of 15 to 30 cm (6 to 12 in).

The tomato is the edible berry of the plant Solanum lycopersicum, commonly known as a tomato plant. Tomato plants typically grow to 1–3 meters (3–10 ft) in height. They are vines that have a weak stem that sprawls and typically needs support.

Flowers/Herbs:

Dill (Anethum graveolens) is a perennial herb that typically reaches 2 to 4 feet tall at maturity. Its leaves are used fresh or dried as an herb in dips, soups, salads, and other dishes.

Four-o’clock, also called marvel-of-Peru, or beauty-of-the-night, (Mirabilis jalapa) ornamental perennial plant, of the family Nyctaginaceae, native to tropical America. Four-o’clock is a quick-growing species up to one metre (three feet) tall, with oval leaves on short leafstalks.

Milkweed, (genus Asclepias), genus of about 140 species of herbaceous perennial flowering plants belonging to the dogbane family Apocynaceae (formerly in Asclepiadaceae). This milkweed grows to about 1.5 meters(5 feet) tall, usually occurring in clusters of stout stems. It has rhizomes and quickly forms colonies. Leaves are 15-20 centimeters (6-8 inches) long and 5-9 centimeters (2-3.6 inches) wide.

Parsley, (Petroselinum crispum), hardy biennial herb of the family Apiaceae, or Umbelliferae, native to Mediterranean lands. In the second season of growth, seed stalks rise about 1 metre (3.3 feet) tall and are topped by compound umbels of small, greenish yellow flowers followed by tiny fruits, or seeds, similar to those of a carrot but without spines. Parsley seedlings are small and weak; they emerge with difficulty from heavy crusty soils.

Exotic Seeds

Not pictured due to infrequent stock.