Second Monday Book Club Discussion

When: September 11 @ 7pm
Where: Romulus Public Library Meeting Room

We will be discussing The Storied Life of A. J. Fikry by Gabrielle Zevin.

A. J. Fikry’s life is not at all what he expected it to be. He lives alone, his bookstore is experiencing the worst sales in its history, and now his prized possession, a rare collection of Poe poems, has been stolen. But when a mysterious package appears at the bookstore, its unexpected arrival gives Fikry the chance to make his life over–and see everything anew.

Pick up a copy at the library and join us! Ages 18 + are welcome.

2017 Books

January 9: The Kept by James Scott
February 13: Life After Life by Kate Atkinson
March 13: The 100-Year-Old Man Who Climbed Out the Window and Disappeared by Jonas Jonassan
April 10: The Twelve Tribes of Hattie by Ayana Mathis
May 8: Calling Me Home by Julie Kibler
June 12: The Kitchen House by Kathleen Grissom
July 10: Wild by Cheryl Strayed
August 14: In the Lake of the Woods by Tim O’Brien
September 11: The Storied Life of A.J. Fikry by Gabrielle Zevin
October 9: The Ocean at the End of the Lane by Neil Gaiman
November 13: The Necklace by Cheryl Jarvis
December 11: City of Thieves by David Benioff

(Subject to change based on availability of books)

 

Senior Book Club Discussion

When:  September 19 at 10:30am
Where: Romulus Senior Center – 36525 Bibbins Street

We will be discussing The Paris Architect by Charles Belfoure, and In the Garden of Beasts by Erik Larson.

The Paris Architecthttps://static1.squarespace.com/static/546bc958e4b05489a99a8e9c/t/546e0543e4b0fde4aacf88a3/1416496452419/

In 1942 Paris, gifted architect Lucien Bernard accepts a commission that will bring him a great deal of money – and maybe get him killed. But if he’s clever enough, he’ll avoid any trouble. All he has to do is design a secret hiding place for a wealthy Jewish man, a space so invisible that even the most determined German officer won’t find it. He sorely needs the money, and outwitting the Nazis who have occupied his beloved city is a challenge he can’t resist.  But when one of his hiding spaces fails horribly, and the problem of where to hide a Jew becomes terribly personal, Lucien can no longer ignore what’s at stake. The Paris Architect asks us to consider what we owe each other, and just how far we’ll go to make things right.  Written by an architect whose knowledge imbues every page, this story becomes more gripping with every soul hidden and every life saved.

In the Garden of Beastshttp://media.npr.org/assets/bakertaylor/covers/i/in-the-garden-of-beasts/9780307408853_custom-622e0daf28e137eac6059d67da4f8e45d751fbf8-s400-c85.jpg

The time is 1933, the place, Berlin, when William E. Dodd becomes America’s first ambassador to Hitler’s Nazi Germany in a year that proved to be a turning point in history.  A mild-mannered professor from Chicago, Dodd brings along his wife, son, and flamboyant daughter, Martha. At first Martha is entranced by the parties and pomp, and the handsome young men of the Third Reich with their infectious enthusiasm for restoring Germany to a position of world prominence. Enamored of the “New Germany,” she has one affair after another, including with the suprisingly honorable first chief of the Gestapo, Rudolf Diels.  But as evidence of Jewish persecution mounts, confirmed by chilling first-person testimony, her father telegraphs his concerns to a largely indifferent State Department back home. Dodd watches with alarm as Jews are attacked, the press is censored, and drafts of frightening new laws begin to circulate. As that first year unfolds and the shadows deepen, the Dodds experience days full of excitement, intrigue, romance—and ultimately, horror, when a climactic spasm of violence and murder reveals Hitler’s true character and ruthless ambition.  Suffused with the tense atmosphere of the period, and with unforgettable portraits of the bizarre Göring and the expectedly charming–yet wholly sinister–Goebbels, In the Garden of Beasts lends a stunning, eyewitness perspective on events as they unfold in real time, revealing an era of surprising nuance and complexity. The result is a dazzling, addictively readable work that speaks volumes about why the world did not recognize the grave threat posed by Hitler until Berlin, and Europe, were awash in blood and terror.

2017 Books

January 17: Tell No One by Harlan Coben, and Rebecca by Daphne Du Maurier
February 21: Mrs. Grant and Madame Jule by Jennifer Chiaverini, and The Lincoln Myth by Steve Berry
March 21: The Valley of Amazement by Amy Tan, Ruby by Cynthia Bond
April 18: The Dovekeepers by Alice Hoffman, and The People of the Book by Geraldine Brooks
May 16: Beautiful Ruins by Jess Walter, and Laura Lamont’s Life in Pictures by Emma Straub
June 20: The Poisonwood Bible by Barbara Kingsolver, and East of Eden by John Steinbeck
July 18: The Aviator’s Wife by Melanie Benjamin, and The Spymistress by Jennifer Chiaverini
August 15: Gilead by Marilynne Robinson, and State of Wonder by Anne Patchett
September 19: The Paris Architect by Charles Belfoure, and In the Garden of Beasts by Erik Larson
October 17: Go Set a Watchman by Harper Lee, and The Heart is a Lonely Hunter by Carson McCullers
November 21: Homer and Langley by E. L. Doctorow, and Falling Angels by Tracy Chevalier
December 19: Rules of Civility by Amor Towles, and The Autobiography of Mrs. Tom Thumb by Melanie Benjamin

(Subject to change based on availability of books)